Updated picture of Connie & Willie

I have found a photograph of Willie and Connie that is in much better condition than the one originally used. It must have been taken about this time, looking at the age of the two of them. I have inserted the "new" picture in the post that introduces Connie.
Click to link to the post.

8 comments:

The Gray Monk said...

Thank you for sharing these extremely interesting letters and notes with the rest of us. My own grandfather served with the 36th Division in the Royal Inniskillen Fusiliers until the Somme when he was badly wounded. After recovery he was reposted to the Royal Garrison Artillery as he was no longer fit for the Infantry and served the remainder of the war in France and Flanders on a Howitzer Battery. Unfortunately he never shared any of his memories of this conflict and his letters home (He was 15 when he joined up) have not survived.

Julie said...

Yes, I can see the cerebral palsy in Connie's stance - it is as though someone has propped her up against the chair especially for the photograph. Reminiscent of the later stance forced upon FDR.

VetMichael said...

Thank you for the updated pictures. And Julie is spot on about the similarities with FDR's "standing photos" from early in his Presidency - definitely a delicate stance Connie has there.

Anonymous said...

I have just found this fascinating blog, went through it from start to finish. The thing that most surprised me is that whilst Harry seemed to be normal working class, both his handwriting and his spelling are a far cry from what is common in those of the same station and education today. Since you appear to use the blog as a teaching tool, has this subject ever cropped up?

Silarnon said...

I'd love to see some pictures of Connie & Willie when they were older, if any can be found.

Also the significant women - Kate and Ethel.

Anonymous said...

http://www.welt.de/welt_print/article1729072/Lieber_Jack_ich_lebe_noch.html

Lee said...

Cool. It's really cool.

Anonymous said...

The Leeds General Infirmary was built between 1863 and 1868, this imposing Gothic brick structure is one of Leeds' most striking buildings. It is the work of Sir George Gilbert Scott who was also responsible for the Albert Memorial and St Pancras Station. Its walls are adorned with bronze tablets commemorating past benefactors, directors and staff. On a wintry day, the infirmary is best viewed from the Hogshead pub opposite.