Asiago, Mid June 1918

No word has been heard from Harry for quite a while. Saturday 15th June 1918, the Austrian army's attack on the Piave river front that was started on Monday 10th was complemented by a second major attack at Asiago, where Harry was in the front line. The War Diary gives an account of the experiences of Harry's Battalion for this battle.

Consult the Battalion's War Diary for June 1918.

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

I can feel the tension building as I sit and read the blog. Come on Harry. You can make it!

Nanny (Shirley) said...

I have been worried about Harry - but hope all will be well and the he is NOT the casualty.

LetsEatLunch said...

sweet site i loved WW1!

Anonymous said...

For the first time since I started reading this blog, I am concerned for Harry's safety. Please be OK.

G. Tingey. said...

Trying again - my first one got lost in etherness, somwhere ...
We ar coming up to the Austrian attack called the Battle of the Piave, are we not?
15th-21st June 1918....
See:
http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/piaveriver.htm
http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/piave_trevelyan.htm

Rocco said...

Tomorrow, 15th (1918) an Austrian attack is expected on the Asiago Plateau. Alcohol has been distributed to the soldiers before the attack. We know the HISTORY but we don't know Harry's story for tomorrow, let's hope.
Tomorrow 15th (2008) I'll be next to the Piave River for the LONDON SCOTTISH PIPES & DRUMS parade. I'll look to them thinking on the 9th York & Lancs on the Plateau.

Anonymous said...

Oh no! my heart just sank - I so hope this is not a pre warning, to let us all down gently, Harry must make it!

Linda

Anonymous said...

Is that 'gas' mentioned in the war diary on the 15th what we generally refer to as 'mustard' gas?

Kittybriton said...

I believe the "lachrymatory" gas probably would be "mustard" gas, or tear gas as we would call it today. But this was nasty stuff, capable of blinding victims who weren't quick enough to put the gas mask on, and generally lethal if breathed for any length of time.
I await Harry's next letter with hope, and prayers for his safety.

John said...

I went to pray for Harry but realized that it's strange to pray for someone in an event 90 years ago. It reminds me how wonderful this blog is making all of us identify with Harry as if it were today. I hope he'll be alright. There were survivors who went on so let's hope Harry was one of them.

farawayhats said...

Your description of your trip and the photos was excellent.

Anonymous said...

Still no news? We've had long gaps before where we didn't hear from Harry for a while. But I'm still worried and I'm afraid Linda might be right about it being a pre-warning.
Jackie

Doctor Pion said...

The wait for mail (good or bad) really is excruciating. What was the war news like at home? When did his family learn of the major battle near Asiago? (I knew this was coming from having read about that area via Google, after discovering that there is more to Asiago than cheese, but did they?)

On other comments, lachrymatory refers to tears, hence a tear gas, not a blistering agent like mustard gas. A gas mask will not protect you against mustard except to keep it out of your lungs. What I don't know is if they might have referred to a toxic gas like chlorine as a tear gas back in WW I if it was in a low concentration, but consider it likely. These were crude weapons used to create a breakthrough.

accypal11 said...

I was introduced to this blog at the Derby TA100 event on Satutrday 27th September 2008 and would like to say that the York and Lancaster Contingent of The Great War Society is visitng the Piave River on 26th October 2008 for a weekend of remembrance. we will Honour Harry as we will remember Walter Tull who also served in Italy during the Great War.